Manipulation of micro scale particles in an optical trap using interferometry

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Glenn Research Center, Available from NASA Center for Aerospace Information , [Cleveland, Ohio], Hanover, MD
Laser interferometry., Force distribution., Trapped particles., Feasibility analysis., Mirrors., Nanotechnology., Nanoparticles., Light b
StatementRobin Seibel.
Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA/CR-2002-211975., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-211975.
ContributionsNASA Glenn Research Center.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17721022M

Interferometry allows the manipulation of intensity distributions, and thus, force distributions on a trapped particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of such manipulation, nm light, from an argon-ion laser, was injected into a Mach Zender by: 4. Interferometry allows the manipulation of intensity distributions, and thus, force distributions on a trapped particle.

To demonstrate the feasibility of such manipulation, nm light, from an Author: Robin Seibel. Get this from a library.

Details Manipulation of micro scale particles in an optical trap using interferometry PDF

Manipulation of micro scale particles in an optical trap using interferometry. Manipulation of micro scale particles in an optical trap using interferometry book Seibel; NASA Glenn Research Center.]. Interferometry allows the manipulation of intensity distributions, and thus, force distributions on a trapped particle.

To demonstrate the feasibility of such manipulation, nm light, from an argon-ion laser, was injected into a Mach Zender interferometer. One mirror in the interferometer was oscillated with a piezoelectric phase : Robin Seibel.

A single-beam optical trapping of microscopic particles and biological cells is demonstrated by using higher-order mode Nd:YAG laser beams at mu m for the first known time. using phase modulation and interferometry to manipulate a single particle in an optical trap1.

An optical trap, or optical tweezers, provides a method for performing nano scale operations. While optical tweezers cannot directly resolve the details of a nano structure. Optical techniques provide high sensitivity at the nanoscale and can be used to measure single biomolecule mechanics.

90 To do so, a bead is attached to one end of a molecule with the other end anchored to a nonmoving surface. It is possible to examine the stretch response in a molecule under an applied load by moving the optical trap away from the anchored molecule and observing the bead's.

Main Optical Trapping and Manipulation of Neutral Particles Using Lasers: A Reprint Volume With Commentaries Due to the technical work on the site downloading books (as well as file conversion and sending books to email/kindle) may be unstable from May, 27 to May, 28 Also, for users who have an active donation now, we will extend the donation.

Arthur J. Decker's 16 research works with 48 citations and reads, including: Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers. Graham M. Gibson's 76 research works with 1, citations reads, including: What Caging Force Cells Feel in 3D Hydrogels: A Rheological Perspective.

Ashkin, A., Dziedzic, J. & Yamane, T. Optical trapping and manipulation of single cells using infrared laser beams.

Description Manipulation of micro scale particles in an optical trap using interferometry FB2

Nature– (). ADS CAS Article PubMed Google Scholar. Self-driven particles on asymmetric trap arrays Author(s): Optical manipulation of vesicles for optofluidic applications Author(s): Ray optics in combination with the Gaussian beam propagation method for optical trapping of free-shaped particles in micro fluidic systems Author(s).

We have developed a technique of generating a micro-bubble inside an optical trap by using a material (Mo-based Soft Oxometalate (SOM) compound) that absorbs at the trapping laser wavelength. Using the inherent momentum of light, particles are trapped in the high intensity field of a focused laser beam thus allowing for the manipulation of microscopic particles.

This paper discusses the current development of a state-of-the-art optical trap with increased sensitivity for the measurement of single molecule and motor protein mechanics. Ashkin A. Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles using lasers. Singapore, World Scientific,[40] Timo AN, Vincent LYL, Alexander BS, et al.

Optical tweezers computational toolbox. J Opt A Pure Appl Opt ;9:S [41] Karl Otto G. Manipulation of cells with laser microbeam scissors and optical tweezers: a review.

The chapter then covers the trapping and manipulation of particles in intermediate micro-to-nano scale size (optical tweezer). The problematic case of trapping ultrasmall nanoparticles (nano tweezer) is covered last. Finally, the chapter presents the most recent area of using thermal effects to trap particles in a liquid environment.

Optical tweezers are a unique tool for manipulating neutral particles in micro/nano scale and have wide applications in biological and physical fields.

However, the majority of tasks with optical tweezers are carried out manually at present time. The manual operation is incompetent in dynamic environment. Automated manipulation of micro/nano particles with optical tweezers can improve both the. of the optical trap, and this feature offers distinct advantages when a single optical trap ‘juggles’ multiple particles (33– 35).

Tracking in 3-D using quadrant photodiodes has been described (27,28). In principle, two-photon fluorescence in-Traffic ; 2: – duced by the high-intensity optical tweezers can also provide. However, confinement and fine-scale manipulation of micro and nanoscale particles remains a significant challenge in the field.

At present, particle trapping methods based on acoustic, electrokinetic, magnetic, and optical fields are utilized, but some of these methods are limited to particles with specific material properties and/or bulky.

KEYWORDS: Microscopes, Optical lithography, Glasses, Particles, Molecules, Crystals, Composites, Physics, Optical tweezers, Polymer optical fibers Read Abstract + We have developed a technique of generating a micro-bubble inside an optical trap by using a material (Mo-based Soft Oxometalate (SOM) compound) that absorbs at the trapping laser.

Three-dimensional optical manipulation of microparticles, cells, and biomolecules in a noncontact and noninvasive manner is crucial for biophotonic, nanophotonic, and biomedical fields.

Optical tweezers, as a standard optical manipulation technique, have some limitations in precise manipulation of micro-objects in microfluidics and in vivo because of their bulky lens system and. KEYWORDS: Sensors, Microscopy, Particles, Luminescence, Computer simulations, Spatial light modulators, Image quality, Optical tweezers, Image filtering, Deconvolution Read Abstract + Optically Trapped Probe Microscopy (OTPM) is an emerging imaging technique using optically trapped objects as near-field probes, able to sense a variety of local.

Using room temperature diamagnetic levitation to position, guide, and trap particles has been achieved using micromagnets with latex beads 6 6. Chetouani, C. Jeandey, V. Haguet, H. Rostaing, C.

Dieppedale, and G. Reyne, “ Diamagnetic levitation with permanent magnets for contactless guiding and trapping of microdroplets and particles in air and liquids,” IEEE Transactions on.

Optical tweezers work on the principle that a highly focused continuous-wave laser beam 1, typically with a Gaussian (TEM 00 mode) intensity profile, can optically trap and manipulate micro- and nano-sized dielectric particles.

In such techniques, created by using a high-quality microscope objective, the particles are trapped within the narrow. use of optical forces to trap dielectric microspheres held within a thin layer of water and vesicles in onion cells. The typical mechanical forces involved are on the scale of piconewtons (10 12 N).

Relative to this scale, hydrody-namical forces (drag and di usion) on the microspheres and vesicles are substantial. Thus, the optical trap pro. Optical trapping and laser interferometry enable the non-invasive manipulation of colloids, which can be used to investigate the microscopic mechanics of surrounding media or bound macromolecules.

For efficient trapping and precise tracking, the sample media must ideally be homogeneous and quiescent whereas such conditions are usually not.

Optical tweezers provides dynamic, flexible manipulation of specific single cells. Optical tweezers uses the gradient force of light to trap particles using a highly-focused laser beam (Ashkin et al., ), and has been used in many research applications, such as measuring.

But, unlike optical tweezers, they are fixed at a spot and can only capture particles close to them. In their earlier work, researchers had managed to transport nano-scale cargo using plasmonic tweezers integrated with magnetic nano-robots.

However, the tweezers could not be used for certain types of colloids such as magnetic nanoparticles. An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps.

The principles of optical manipulation A single beam, gradient-force optical trap is based on the interaction of a micron-sized dielectric particle with a beam of light that is brought to a diffraction-limited focal spot.

Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles using lasers. [Arthur Ashkin] First observation of laser radiation pressure. Observation of the first three-dimensional all-optical trap. Scattering force on atoms.

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Saturation of the scattering force on atoms. Optically induced rotation of an anisotropic micro. Principle of Optical Tweezers: Optical Trapping and Position Detection.

Optical tweezers utilize optical traps to hold micron-sized polystyrene or silica beads as force sensors to manipulate single macromolecules attached to the beads [4,54,55].An expanded and collimated infrared laser beam (with typical nm wavelength) is focused by a high-numerical-aperture objective lens.

The optical pickup was used to trap both polystyrene colloids and red blood cells, where the trap strength was determined by measuring the viscous drag required to break the particle out of the trap. In this, the trap was translated within a microfluidic channel and the limiting velocity at which the trapped colloid was dragged out of the trap.